Honors Program  
Honors Courses


BIOL/CHEM 1003 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY (3 hours)
This course focuses on the acquisition and meaning of scientific data leading to the development and support of hypotheses and theories. The use of scientific knowledge in selected areas is investigated with regard to its application to technology, human well-being and related ethical problems.

BIOL 1114H SELECTED CONCEPTS IN BIOLOGY (4 hours)
Concepts in biology, physiology, ecology and evolution are examined in class and laboratory. The course is designed for students who have little or no training in science and does not count as a course toward a biology major. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory each week.

ENGL 1113H HONORS COMPOSITION I (3 hours)
Honors Composition I shares the goals and principles as ENGL 1113. Designed to accommodate the variety of writing abilities of honors students, ENGL 1113H functions as a community of learners who work collaboratively to become more perceptive and capable writers.

ENGL 1213H HONORS COMPOSITION II (3 hours)
Honors Composition II builds on the concepts and experiences of Honors Composition I and shares the same goals and principles as ENGL 1213. Taking a rhetorical approach to thinking and writing, students explore writing applications beyond academics. This course may include service learning or collaborative research.

HIST 1003H UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1876 (3 hours)
Introductory course in U.S. history emphasizing the development of American ideas to 1876. Topics include colonial development, American nation-building and exceptionalism, slavery, economic development, and the Civil War.

HIST 1103H UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1876 (3 hours)
Introductory course in American history emphasizing the development of American ideas since 1876. The seminar includes an analysis of historians’ interpretations of American history.

HIST 1203H WORLD CIVILIZATION TO 1500 (3 hours)
Seminar-type class that traces events through the collapse of the ancient world to the beginning of the modern age.

HIST 1303H WORLD CIVILIZATION SINCE 1500 (3 hours)
Seminar-type class that traces events through the collapse of feudalism to the advanced technology of today.
 
KES 1302H WELLNESS (2 hours)
A holistic approach to lifetime personal health management.

PHRH 1103H PUBLIC SPEAKING (3 hours)
Focus on human communication theory with emphasis on effective public speaking.

POLS 1003H GOVERNANCE IN AMERICA (3 hours)
Seminar-type class that describes, analyzes, and evaluates American government and politics including the Constitution and its philosophical origins, federal-state relations, political parties, interest groups, Congress, the presidency, and current public policy issues.

PSYC 1113H INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3 hours)
An introductory course examining fundamental psychological principles with emphasis on increased self-understanding so that students can better understand themselves, significant others, and the influence of the social environment on their psychological lives.

REL 2513H INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGIONS (3 hours)
A phenomenologically based survey of patterns of life and thought in the world's religions, with major attention to representative indigenous religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese religions, Judaism and Islam.

REL 1003H INTRODUCTION TO BIBLICAL LITERATURE (3 hours)
An introduction to the history, thought and literature of ancient Israel before the time of Jesus; the life and teachings of Jesus; and the history, thought, and literature of early Christianity.

SOC 2013H STRUCTURE OF SOCIETY (3 hours)
A foundation course for all areas of sociological study. Content deals with the basic concepts and perspectives of sociology.

ENGL/ CLASSICS OF WESTERN PHIL 2004H CULTURE I (4 hours)
A study of philosophical and literary masterpieces from the ancient world through the Renaissance.

ENGL/ CLASSICS OF WESTERN PHIL 2114H CULTURE II (4 hours)
A study of philosophical and literary masterpieces from the neoclassical through the modern period. This course examines the historical, philosophical, social and cultural contexts in which each literary work was written and attempts to relate the work to the intellectual spirit of its time. We discuss how to read and appreciate literature as an art form and how each author uses literary techniques to convey his ideals and world view.

INDP 1013H ARTS AND HUMAN VALUES (3 hours)
An exploration of the variety of art forms, including cinema, drama, music, dance and the graphic arts. This course has both aesthetic and humanistic orientation: the course examines the nature, form and intrinsic value of works of art and what they express concerning human values.

INDP 3163H HONOR JUNIOR SENIOR SEMINAR (3 hours)
A variable-topic seminar that is the capstone course for all honors students.