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Master's Curriculum in Criminology

Master of Arts in Criminology & Master of Science in Criminology

Both programs require 36 credit hours, and can be completed in as little as 12 months. Classes are taught in the evening, one night per week, in an 8-week accelerated format either on our campus or by distance education (depending on your location). Students are typically enrolled in two classes during each 8-week session, which allows you to finish your degree in as little as 12 months.

Which program is right for you?

Master of Arts (Non-Thesis) in Criminology

The M.A. program prepares students to pursue or further their careers in law enforcement with a strong theoretical background and practical skills to be leaders and agents of positive change.

Master of Science (Thesis) in Criminology

The M.S. program prepares students interested in conducting research, pursuing a Ph.D., or teaching.

Master of Arts in Criminology
  • Criminology Core Courses (24 credit hours)
  • Criminology Electives (9 credit hours)
  • Leadership in Criminology (3 credit hours)

Fall I

MSC5103 Crime Victims
MSC6103 Critical Issues in Justice

Fall II

MSC5603 Advanced Research Methods
MSC Core Elective

Spring I

MSC5863 Advanced Studies in Criminological Theory
MSC5823 Diversity and Crime

Spring II

MSC5363 Theories of Justice
MSC Core Elective

Summer I

MSC5713 Resocialization of Law Violators
MSC6873 Practicum or Field Study

Summer II

MSC6363 Leadership in Criminal Justice
MSC Core Elective

Master of Science in Criminology
  • Criminology Core Courses (24 credit hours)
  • Criminology Electives (6 credit hours)
  • Master’s Thesis (6 credit hours)

Fall I

MSC5103 Crime Victims
MSC6103 Critical Issues in Justice

Fall II

MSC5603 Advanced Research Methods
MSC Core Elective

Spring I

MSC5863 Advanced Studies in Criminological Theory
MSC5823 Diversity and Crime

Spring II

MSC5363 Theories of Justice
MSC Core Elective

Summer I

MSC5713 Resocialization of Law Violators
MSC6873 Practicum or Field Study

Summer II

MSC6886 Master’s Thesis Hours (6)

Course Descriptions

5103 Crime Victims

Analysis of the victimology model. Emphasis is on the victim, the aca­demic institutional perspective, the criminal justice perspective, and the statistical approach.

5603 Advanced Research Methods

In this course students create, synthesize, and defend one of four types of a mixed method research design, students are expected to have had a basic research course, which included qualitative and quantitative data methods.

6103 Critical Issues in Justice

This course analyzes contemporary issues confronting the criminal justice system. The topics change over-time, reflecting current issues facing the system, e.g., the death penalty, restorative justice, or eth­ics.

5863 Criminological Theory

This course is an advanced theory course on criminological theory. Students complete an in-depth analysis of contemporary theories.

5823 Diversity and Crime

This course critically examines major theories, research findings, poli­cies, and controversies concerning race/ethnicity, gender, class, sexu­ality and crime.

5363 Theories of Justice 3

This course explores one of the most prominent theoretical construc­tions of justice compared to other concepts of justice: John Rawl’s Theory of Justice.

5713 Resocialization of Law Violators

A major objective of correctional agencies has been to change per­sons convicted of crime so that they are reformed, resocialized, treated, or modified. This course deals with the issue of such changes and examines techniques of producing changes.

6873 Practicum or Field Study  

Students sign a contract and are placed with criminal justice agencies for a minimum of forty hours per credit hour. Students will keep field notes, be evaluated at the practicum site, and write a paper directly related to the practicum assignment.

6886 Master’s Thesis Hours  

Crafting and editing the master’s thesis consisting of original research in the field of criminology and approval of the student’s the­sis committee. Final course prior to graduation from program. Course may be repeated until master thesis is completed and defended according to departmental standards.

6563 Leadership in Criminal Justice  

Focuses on leadership and administration of criminal justice institutions.  Topics include ethics, organizational change, power and influence, conflict, and communication.