Distinguished Scholarships  
SCHOLARSHIP PREPARATION GUIDE

If you hope to become a distinguished scholar, even as a freshman, you should begin making plans for your college career. Planning for study abroad and internships, developing connections with people in your field, making contributions to humanitarian causes will all help you develop as a person and as an outstanding scholar. These activities will allow you mature and to prepare yourself for graduate schools and a productive work life. They will also help you become viable candidate for national scholarships.

Excel

  • Keep your grade point average at 3.7 (3.9 for Rhodes or Marshall)
  • Be on the President’s Honor Roll
  • Be part of the Honors Program
  • Make sure your writing skills are strong

Read and Become Informed

  • In addition to course work, read the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the LA Times on a regular basis to learn about current events, to know what’s going on in cultural events both in the US and abroad.
  • Listen to National Public Radio
  • Read the New York Times Review of Books—know who famous authors are and what new things are happening in your field and who’s making them happen
  • Read periodicals and journals in your field to keep up
  • Ask professors for extra readings in areas that really interest you
  • Take literature courses to develop the habit of reading the major literary classics

Travel/Study Abroad & Internships

  • Study abroad is almost a must for Rhodes or Marshall Scholarships
  • Take a semester and do an internship with TWC in D. C.
  • Find another local internship that provides social service or furthers your career area
  • Study and become as fluent as possible in a foreign language

Participate

  • Become a member of groups or organizations that interest you and that allow you to meet other people in your field
  • Issue Oriented Group Participation
  • Gender; Environment; Politics; Human Rights; Peace

Leadership

  • Chair a committee
  • Hold an office
  • Meet a need: start an organization, do fund-raising, work on a campaign or project

Examples of groups that might give you opportunities for participation and leadership:

  1. Church / Synagogue/ Mosque
  2. Student government
  3. Local Professional Groups
    1. Medical
    2. Psychological
    3. Musical
    4. Political
  4. Student Organizations in your Academic field

Athletics

  • Formal Sports Team
  • Personal Health—swim, bike, yoga, dance etc.

Hobbies

  • Music
  • Art
  • Gardening
  • Old Movies

Services

  • Habitat for Humanity
  • Runs and Walks
  • Tutoring
  • Service Learning Project
  • Meals on Wheels
  • Salvation Army
  • Holiday Collections
  • Hunger Banquet

Academic Honor Organizations

  • Departmental Organizations
  • Campus-wide Societies