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Brigette Zorn

Political Science, 2006. 

Masters of Health Administration, Ohio University, 2017

Currently 

Senior Development Manager, Mercy Health Foundation

Briefly describe your career path. 

I graduated from college in 2006 with a political science degree, and then worked in political fundraising in Washington DC for several years before returning to Oklahoma City. I worked in non-profit fundraising for a while and then in 2013, driven by a health crisis in my family, moved into health care philanthropy. I accepted my current position at Mercy in 2017, and now help with strategy and communications for all of 18 Mercy's foundations across 4 states. From securing major political contributions at the national level to running some of the largest work place giving campaigns in the country, my ten+ years of development experience has been challenging and also lots of fun.         


Describe what an average day looks like. 

Mercy is a large health system, which means I am often collaborating with coworkers who are many miles from here. I spend a lot of time communicating and building consensus via conference calls and e-mail, and also get the opportunity to travel occasionally. Writing, researching, presenting new ideas, building processes, and helping make sure our local teams are following fundraising best practices are some of my daily activities.

...be open to new career paths and be willing to take risks to pursue opportunities that may seem outside of your current field. Careers are long! Stay curious and don’t be afraid to try out different jobs or industries.

What advice would you give your college self about pursuing work in your current industry? 

In college, I was really focused on having a career in politics and never could have foreseen working in health care. My advice to undergraduate me and to anyone starting their careers is to be open to new career paths and be willing to take risks to pursue opportunities that may seem outside of your current field. Careers are long! Stay curious and don’t be afraid to try out different jobs or industries.  

What is a lesson learned at OKCU that you have been able to apply to your career? 

I first learned what it means to be a servant leader at OCU. To work in service of others is a real motivator for me. I love working for Mercy, an organization with a relentless drive to seek out and put the needs of others first.

What is the most significant thing that’s happened to you since graduating? 

Can I make a list?! A lot has happened!

  • I helped elect a ton of Democrats to Congress in 2008 and helped pass the Affordable Care Act.
  • I got married and had a son.
  • A member of my family became critically ill about six years ago and I spent a considerable amount of time in a hospital setting. This experience propelled me to learn more about health care and how to make it better, which is what led me down my current career path.
  • I started and completed an MHA degree.

Where do you see yourself in 10 years? 

I see myself still working in health care and still excited and curious about all the ways it can be improved.

What is your favorite OKCU memory? 

I ran for student senate president twice and lost both times! But campaigning with my friends, late night strategy sessions and the thrill of election day on campus are some of my all time favorite memories.